Wild plan to NUKE the moon considered by US government's secret UFO program, newly released reports reveal

A WILD plan to nuke the moon was reportedly considered by the US Government’s secret UFO program, according to a bombshell document.

Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) officials reportedly examined the viability of untested proposals such as sending nuclear explosives into outer space.

The plan never materialized but it would’ve involved using thermonuclear devices to blast through the lunar crust and mantle.

It was part of a proposed mission to look for “extremely lightweight metals”, according to the documents.

Officials said an “explosive lens” would’ve been required to shatter the rocks.

Creating a tunnel in the moon would’ve helped examine if a negative mass existed, according to the reports.

And, the report revealed the tunnel wall would’ve had to have been created using ceramic material.

One Defense Intelligence Agency document claimed: “Gravity is the bane of aerospace transportation.”

And, officials said: “Making a tunnel through the moon, provided there is a good supply of negative mass, could revolutionize interstellar space flight.”

If an object had a negative mass, it would accelerate towards you when pushed instead of away.

It’s not the first time that nuking the moon had been considered by US officials.

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Air Force officials considered plans during the Cold War – a 50-year ideological conflict between the US and the Soviet Union.

A top-secret plan, known as Project A119, was devised in the 1950s and its aim was to detonate a nuclear bomb on the moon.

American officials wanted to gain an advantage over their Soviet counterparts during the so-called Space Race.

It was feared that Moscow had gained the upper hand over Washington DC.

The Soviets had sent the Sputnik satellite into space which created panic among the upper echelons of the Washington political establishment, History reported.

The US Air Force wanted to say: "Hey, look at what we can do. We can blow the hell out of the moon."

But, the project was scrapped just a year later as officials believed a moon landing was more popular among the American people.

SPACE RACE

Officials also feared that it if had gone ahead with the program it could’ve resulted in the militarization of space, fueling fears of a galactical conflict.

 US Department of Defense officials also considered how to achieve invisibility cloaking as part of the wild claims.

The Sun exclusively revealed that researchers were apparently inspired by HG Wells’ book The Invisible Man and the Fantastic Four comic book character Susan Storm.

Officials suggested three ways to achieve invisibility, according to the file, "camouflage, transparency, and cloaking".

It also looked into hyperspace – a science fiction concept used in Star Wars relating to higher dimensions and faster than light travel.

The Defense Intelligence Agency released the bombshell documents to The Sun after a Freedom of Information Act request was made in December 2017.

AATIP was a secretive initiative that ran between 2007 and 2012 to study unexplained aerial phenomena.

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Around $22million of funding was provided over the five-year period.

It was outed by whistleblower Luis Elizondo, who headed up the program, back in 2017.

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