PIP mandatory reconsideration: Is PIP backdated after mandatory reconsideration?

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PIP is a vital benefit which goes towards helping those who can’t function the same as everyone else. As with all benefits, however, people claiming them may find they haven’t received what they require. In this case, they will need to request a mandatory reconsideration.

Is PIP backdated after mandatory consideration?

PIP, otherwise known as Personal Independence Payment, helps disabled people and those with long-term ill-health gain more freedom.

The weekly payments aid with extra living costs, allowing the differently-abled to claim hundreds at a time.

But the amount depends on how the condition they suffer from effects them.

Before they start receiving payments, they need to go through professional review.

These reviews determine a rate of aid which is subject to change depending on the outcome of a regular assessment.

Health professionals undertake the review, but claimants won’t always agree with their conclusion.

In this case, they can ask them to look over their decision again via a “mandatory review”.

Those who feel shortchanged can request one under the following circumstances:

  • They think the office dealing with their claim made an error or missed evidence
  • They disagree with the reasoning behind the decision
  • They want the review to look at their decision again

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Anyone who wants to order a mandatory reconsideration must do so within one month of the date on their decision letter.

If the DWP approves one, they will backpay everything owed to the first date of the original decision.

But the department may not get to reconsider some decisions, while others may go straight to appeal.

People must also inform the DWP if their circumstances change, as not doing so may incur a penalty.

They need to inform the department in the following circumstances:

  • If their personal details change, including doctor’s surgery, name or address
  • If their condition or help requirements change
  • If their condition declines, and they may die within the next six months
  • If they enter a hospital or care home
  • If they move abroad
  • If they are detained or imprisoned

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