Laura Ingraham: 'The real wall of moms' are pushing back against schools shutdown

Ingraham: The real wall of moms

Moms in Maryland fight back against closed schools.

The "arbitrary" actions of local officials who insist in keeping schools closed due to the coronavirus pandemic need to be "resisted," said Laura Ingraham on Monday, specifically blasting a recent order from Montgomery County health officials in Maryland.

“Some unelected overpaid county official thinks that he has the unilateral authority to shut it all down?” Ingraham said during her monologue on “The Ingraham Angle.”

Ingraham said that within 24 hours of the order to shut down schools, thousands of parents in the county – which consisted mostly of moms – mobilized to push back against the school shutdown order.

“A Facebook page was set up, a protest was scheduled, and an online petition began. Official email addresses, phone numbers for all relevant officials were posted,” the host said.

HOGAN CLASHES WITH OFFICIALS OVER MANDATE FOR PRIVATE SCHOOLS TO GO VIRTUAL

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Monday revoked the authority of county officials to mandate schools close amid a clash with local health officials.

The controversial decision to keep private and parochial schools closed through October for in-person learning was announced last week, with county health officials arguing that having students in the classroom would present a danger to pupils and teachers as the state grapples with COVID-19.

On Monday, Hogan amended an emergency executive order, which he issued April 5, that allowed local health departments to have the authority to close any individual facility deemed to be unsafe. He called the Montgomery County mandate "overly broad."

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Ingraham said that while young people generally do well with the coronavirus, they are suffering from being removed from in-person schooling.

“The damage, incalculable: academic decline, depression, isolation, suicide, addiction, abuse, let alone the economic calamity for households that can’t afford to have a parent out of work to become a teacher or a tutor,” Ingraham said.

“Staring at screens, doing Zoom classes, it doesn’t keep 90-95 percent of kids engaged and it is bound to widen the education gap between the rich and the poor.”

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